Last edited by Togor
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of Salmon canneries in southeast Alaska found in the catalog.

Salmon canneries in southeast Alaska

Donald L. Guimary

Salmon canneries in southeast Alaska

a documentation of selected historic salmon canneries and cannery sites

by Donald L. Guimary

  • 363 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by The Office in Anchorage, Alaska .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Alaska
    • Subjects:
    • Salmon canneries -- Alaska -- History.,
    • Salmon canning industry -- Alaska -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Donald L. Guimary for the Office of History and Archaeology, Alaska Division of Parks.
      ContributionsAlaska. Office of History and Archaeology.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD9330.S33 U54 1983
      The Physical Object
      Pagination31 leaves, [1] leaf of plates :
      Number of Pages31
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3002384M
      LC Control Number84621426

        The book also gets a lot of its look from salmon labels meticulously collected over 50 years by Karen Hofstad of Petersburg. The Alaska State . Before canneries opened in Alaska in , several salmon salteries operated. The first American shore-based saltery operated at Klawock on Prince of Wales Island in Southeast Alaska by Salmon fishing and canning dominate Alaska's commercial fishing industry.

        B The Bering Sea Pictures collection consists of 32 black-and-white photographic prints of cannery personnel and activities at Alaska Packers Association canneries near Naknek, Alaska. Two of the canneries have been identified by Melvin Monsen, Sr., as Diamond M and Diamond O on the Naknek River. The photographs were taken from Author: Gwendolyn Higgins. SOUTHEAST ALASKA'S HISTORIC SALMON CANNERIES "This volume brings a variety of perspectives and voices together to show Southeast Alaska canneries are far more than places where salmon were put in cans. Rather, they were places that forged the history and identity of the region.".

      I’ve spent every summer for the past two decades working side by side with my husband Ole on the LaDonna Rose, our foot aluminum fishing boat in Southeast Alaska. During the peak of the salmon fishing season the day starts at am and it’s often 10 or 11pm before we go to bed. Our Southeast Alaska line-caught ivory king salmon is packed in a can with a few grains of salt and is tender, mild, and loaded with nutrition. At the office, on the trail, leaving the gym, or a simple lunch at home, you can pop open the can and dig in for a mg of heart-healthy Omega-3s, 45% of the daily recommendation for vitamin D, and.


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Salmon canneries in southeast Alaska by Donald L. Guimary Download PDF EPUB FB2

“Tin Can Country, Southeast Alaska’s Historic Salmon Canneries” is the work of Petersburg resident Karen Hofstad. It’s a coffee table size book with Hofstad’s colorful and historic collection of salmon can labels throughout. The book takes a look at the historical impact of salmon canneries and how they built the economic foundation of Southeast Alaska.

The editor, Anjuli Grantham, is also a fisheries historian. Editor and co-author of Tin Can Country: Southeast Alaska’s Historic Salmon Canneries Anjuli Grantham with a copy of the book. She is giving a. Karen Holfstad spent 50 years collecting stories, labels and other items to tell the story of fishing in Southeast from the late ’s to today.

She stopped by KRBD to share her book “Tin Can Country: Southeast Alaska’s Historic Salmon Canneries.”. The story of Southeast's canneries goes back to the late s, a decade after the United States Salmon canneries in southeast Alaska book Alaska from Russia.

The Russians had been more interested in Alaska's fur trade than the potential riches in the salmon industry, but proponents of the sale, like US Senator Charles Sumner were very aware of the potential riches and spoke glowingly about it on the floor of.

Anjuli Grantham, editor, and Bob King, contributor, discuss the new book, Tin Can Country: Southeast Alaska's Historic Salmon will talk about canneries as sites of southeast Alaskan history and Bob will discuss his chapter on the Hunter Bay book draws from collections in the Alaska State Library's Historical Collections donated by Pat Roppel and Karen Hofstad.

A desirable new book, “Tin Can Country: Southeast Alaska’s Historic Salmon Canneries,” drives home the strong bonds between the great state of the north and the Pacific Northwest. Edited by Anjuli Grantham with individual chapters by top historians and experts including my friend the legendary Karen Hofstad, “Tin Can Country” chronicles the golden age between and This cannery is a direct link to a large part of Alaska’s past – the salmon canning days.

Starting in Southeast Alaska in and growing to a peak in with a pack of million cases, the salmon canning industry has had a powerful impact on the economic and sociological development of Alaska as a territory and as a state. Back in the s, Alaska's bid for statehood was spurred in part by a fight over fish traps.

The behemoth contraptions were placed at the mouths of salmon streams from Ketchikan to. s and early s, the Alaska commercial salmon fi shery quickly grew as technology improved and new markets were developed.

By59 canneries were operating in Alaska and bycanneries were operating (Cooley ). The annual average Alaskan commercial harvest from to was about   A desirable new book, “Tin Can Country: Southeast Alaska’s Historic Salmon Canneries,” drives home the strong bonds between the great state of the north and the Pacific Northwest.

Anjuli Grantham is a public historian and writer based in Juneau. She is currently editing a book about the history of salmon canneries in Southeast Alaska.

Canneries Chetlo Harbor Packing Company, Chetlo Harbor, Washington (operated from tocann cases of Salmon); Gulf of Georgia Cannery, Steveston, British Columbia (re-opened in as a fishing and canning museum); Kake Cannery, Alaska; Kukak Cannery Archeological Historic District, Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska; North Alaska Salmon Company.

The book takes a look at the historical impact of salmon canneries and how they built the economic foundation of Southeast Alaska. The editor, Anjuli Grantham, is also a fisheries historian. “Canneries are really essential to the identity and the economy of Alaska,” Grantham said.

Join editor Anjuli Grantham for a discussion about canneries as sites of Alaskan history, followed by a book signing. Saturday, July 20th at pm in the Main Gallery of the Haines Sheldon Museum. The new book "Tin Can Country: Southeast Alaska’s Historic Salmon Canneries" is a multifaceted exploration of the salmon industry in Southeast Alaska.

Published: Decem by Alaska Business Monthly The Kake Cannery near Kake, Alaska had a significant role in the history of salmon canning in Alaska during the first half of the 20th century.

It is currently threatened by the loss of the canning industry and its deterioration over time. Alaska Fish Traps 6 The first salmon canneries were built in in Sitka and Klawock.

From the start, Canners used imported Chinese labor, but these initial canneries, at least, made peace with the Indians by purchasing salmon from them or paying them to catch it. (Price p 51).

The number of Canneries grew rapidly between and File Size: KB. His business place soon became a center for Chinese men looking for work. At this time he had six contracts with Alaska canneries. One cannery he had a contract with was the Hunters Bay cannery in Southeast Alaska.

He issued tokens for use at this cannery in the denominations of 10c, 25c, 50c and $ in aluminum and $ and $ in brass. Juneau, Alaska (KINY) - The history of salmon canneries in southeast Alaska were the subject of a lecture at the APK Alaska State Libraries Archives & Museum.

Anjuli Grantham and Bob King gave the presentation about a new book, Tin Can Country: Southeast Alaska's Historic Salmon Canneries. Seafood industry researchers to casual history buffs will use and enjoy Tin Can Country - Southeast Alaska's Historic Salmon Canneries. This copiously illustrated edition is filled with stories, essays, historic photographs, custom made maps and colorful salmon can labels that together tell the story of S.E.

Alaska's seafood industry from the time of tidewater Tlingit fish traps to today's. Canning was used in the s in Scotland to keep fish fresh until it could be marketed. By the s, salmon was being canned in Maine and New Brunswick. The commercial salmon canneries had their main origins in California, and in the northwest of the US, particularly on the Columbia River.

They were never important on the US Atlantic Coast, but by the s, the principal canneries had shifted to Alaska.Mindy Dwyer has written and illustrated several children's books, including Alaska’s Sleeping Beauty, Alaska’s Snow White and Her Seven Sled Dogs, and The Salmon Princess.

She is the recipient of "Not Just For Kids Anymore Award" from the Children's Book Council, a National Parenting Publication Award, and a Young Readers Choice Award/5(27).Alaska historian Patricia Roppel references this incident in a recent piece titled Southeast History: Sitka's first salmon cannery - [i] as does Steve Henrikson in an earlier blog article, History in a Can.

[ii] The original story is related by William Governeur Morris, Special Agent of the U.S. Treasury Department in his report on ‘the.